Amin Ghaziani is Associate Professor of Sociology and Canada Research Chair in Sexuality and Urban Studies at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

He has cultivated research projects in the study of culture (where he focuses on how to measure meanings using qualitative approaches), social movements (where he thinks about the relationship between infighting and insurrection), and urban sociology (where he investigates the spatial expressions of sexuality). Please explore the links to the right to learn more about his scholarship and teaching.

Latest News

SEX CULTURES
Spring 2017

I am delighted to announce the UK release of Sex Cultures, published by Polity Press. This is my fourth and most recent book (the North American release date is June 2017). In the project, I provide a unique cultural perspective on the study of sexuality. Rather than focusing on sex acts, which make us feel flustered and blind us to a bigger picture, Professor Ghaziani crafts a conversation about sex cultures that zooms in on the diverse contexts that give meaning to our sexual pursuits and practices. Unlike sex, which is a biological expression, the word sexuality highlights how the materiality of the body acquires cultural meaning as it encounters other bodies, institutions, regulations, symbols, societal norms, values, and worldviews. Think of it this way: sex + culture = sexuality.

If you think you might use the book in a class with at least 12 students, you are eligible to order a free exam copy (click the above link to order directly from Polity). Otherwise, use the Promotion Code PY842 to receive 20% off.

CANADA RESEARCH CHAIR
2016-2021

On December 2, 2016, the Government of Canada announced the new Canada Research Chairs. I am delighted to have been named the Canada Research Chair in Sexuality and Urban Studies. My mandate is to elevate the status of sexuality as a central node for intellectual inquiry, especially as it relates to the cultural development, political programs, and spatial expressions of LGBTQ people.

The Canada Research Chair (CRC) Program invests approximately $265 million per year to attract and retain some of the world’s most accomplished and promising minds. The CRC program is part of a national strategy to make Canada one of the world’s top countries in research excellence in the natural sciences, health sciences, humanities, and social sciences.

You can read an announcement from the university here, along with a separate media release from the Faculty of Arts here.

Awards and Distinctions

Canada Research Chair in Sexuality and Urban Studies, 2016-2021

Editorial Board, American Sociological Review, 2016-2019

Deputy Editor, Mobilization, 2016-2019

Robert E. Park Award for Best Book (Honorable Mention)
Community and Urban Sociology section, American Sociological Association (ASA), 2016
(There Goes the Gayborhood?)

Author Meets Critic, American Sociological Association, 2015
(There Goes the Gayborhood?)

Author Meets Critic, Association of American Geographers, 2015
(There Goes the Gayborhood?)

Author Meets Critic, Canadian Association of Geographers, 2015
(There Goes the Gayborhood?)

Over the Rainbow Book Project List, American Library Association, 2015
(There Goes the Gayborhood?)

Wall Scholar (residential fellowship), Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, 2014

Killam Teaching Prize for Distinguished Instruction, 2014

Best Article Award
Collective Behavior/Social Movements (CBSM) section, ASA
(“Cultural Anchors and the Organization of Differences”), 2012

Clifford Geertz Best Article Award (Honorable Mention)
Sociology of Culture section, ASA
(“Cultural Anchors and the Organization of Differences”), 2012

Early Career Scholar, Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, 2012

Sage Prize for Innovation and Excellence (Finalist)
British Sociological Association (“The Constraints of Culture”), 2010

Charles Tilly Award for Best Book (Honorable Mention)
CBSM section, ASA (The Dividends of Dissent), 2009

Lambda Literary Award for Best Book in LGBT Studies (Finalist)
Lambda Literary Foundation, (The Dividends of Dissent), 2009

Postdoctoral Fellowship, Princeton Society of Fellows
(5 fellows selected from a pool of 1000 applicants), 2008-2011

Select Publications

Ghaziani, Amin. 2017. Sex Cultures. Boston: Polity Press (Cultural Sociology Series).

Brim, Matt and Amin Ghaziani. 2016. “Introduction: Queer Methods.” WSQ: Women’s Studies Quarterly 44(3-4): 14-27.

Ghaziani, Amin; Verta Taylor; and Amy Stone. 2016. “Cycles of Sameness and Difference in LGBT Social Movements.” Annual Review of Sociology 42:165-83.

Ghaziani, Amin. 2015. “The Radical Potential of Post-Gay Politics in the City: A Reply to Molotch, Deener, Tavory, and Pattillo.” Environment and Planning A 47(11): 2409– 2426. [This article is part of a book symposium on There Goes the Gayborhood?. The essays are based on presentations at an Author Meets Critics session at the 2015 ASA meetings in Chicago.]

Ghaziani, Amin. 2015. “‘Gay Enclaves Face Prospect of Being Passé’:
How Assimilation Affects the Spatial Expressions of Sexuality in the United States.” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 39(4): 756-771.

Ghaziani, Amin. 2015. “Lesbian Geographies.” Contexts 14(1): 62-64.

Ghaziani, Amin. 2015. “The Queer Metropolis.” Pp. 305-330 in DeLamater, John and Rebecca F. Plante (Eds). Handbook of the Sociology of Sexualities. New York: Springer.

Ghaziani, Amin. 2014. There Goes the Gayborhood?
Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology Series).

Ghaziani, Amin. 2014. “Measuring Urban Sexual Cultures.”
Theory & Society 43(3-4): 371-93.

Mohr, John and Amin Ghaziani. 2014. “Problems and Prospects of Measurement in the Study of Culture.” Theory & Society 43(3-4): 225-46.

Ghaziani, Amin and Delia Baldassarri. 2011. “Cultural Anchors and the Organization of Differences: A Multi-method Analysis of LGBT Marches on Washington.”
American Sociological Review 76(2): 179-206.

Ghaziani, Amin. 2011. “Post-Gay Collective Identity Construction.”
Social Problems 58(1): 99-125.

Ghaziani, Amin. 2010. “There Goes the Gayborhood?” Contexts 9(3): 64-66.

Ghaziani, Amin. 2009. “An ‘Amorphous Mist’? The Problem of Measurement in the Study of Culture.” Theory & Society 38(6): 581-612.

Ghaziani, Amin. 2008. The Dividends of Dissent: How Conflict and Culture Work in Lesbian and Gay Marches on Washington. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Zuniga, José M., Alan Whiteside, Amin Ghaziani, and John G. Bartlett (Eds.) 2008.
A Decade of HAART: The Development and Global Impact of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. New York: Oxford University Press.

Winter 2016

SOCI217A Research Methods - RESEARCH METHODS Sections

Introduction to research designs and methodologies.

Winter 2016

SOCI369A Sociology of Sexualities - SOCIO OF SEXUAL Sections

Historical and social construction of sexual identities, desires, communities, and politics in the twentieth century.

Education

Ph.D., Northwestern University, 2006
M.S., Northwestern university, 2002
B.A., University of Michigan, 1998

Other Affiliations

Editorial Board, American Sociological Review

Deputy Editor, Mobilization

Faculty Associate, Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies

Faculty Associate, Critical Studies in Sexuality Program

Faculty Associate, Institute for Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Social Justice

 

Amin Ghaziani is Associate Professor of Sociology and Canada Research Chair in Sexuality and Urban Studies at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

He received his Ph.D. in a sociology and organization behavior joint program from Northwestern University in 2006. Before joining the faculty at UBC, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Princeton Society of Fellows (2008 – 2011).

Professor Ghaziani’s research demonstrates how LGBT people use “cultural anchors” to manage impulses of sameness and difference in social movement organizing (American Sociological Review 2011, award-winning lead article; Annual Review of Sociology 2016); how changing meanings of sexuality in today’s so-called “post-gay” era affect collective identity (Social Problems 2011); the effects of heterosexual in-migration into gay enclaves (Princeton University Press 2014; International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 2015; Environment and Planning A 2015); gender differences in residential location decisions (Contexts 2015); how to manage the problem of measurement in the study of culture (Theory and Society 2009); how to measure urban sexual cultures, specifically (Theory and Society 2014); and the unexpectedly generative effects of political infighting among sexual minorities (University of Chicago Press 2008, award-winning book).

Professor Ghaziani has won several awards for his research and teaching, including a 2009 Lambda Literary Award Finalist for Best Book in LGBT Studies (The Dividends of Dissent); 2009 Charles Tilly Honorable Mention Award for Best Book from the Collective Behavior/Social Movements section of the American Sociological Association (The Dividends of Dissent); 2010 Sage Prize for Innovation and Excellence Finalist from the British Sociological Association (The Constraints of Culture); 2012 Clifford Geertz Honorable Mention Award for Best Article from the Sociology of Culture section (Cultural Anchors and the Organization of Differences); 2012 Best Article Award from the Collective Behavior/Social Movements section (Cultural Anchors and the Organization of Differences); 2014 Killam Teaching Prize from UBC; and in 2015, his book There Goes the Gayborhood? received 3 Author Meets Critic sessions from the American Sociological Association, the Association of American Geographers, and the Canadian Sociological Association.

His first book, The Dividends of Dissent: How Conflict and Culture Work in Lesbian and Gay Marches on Washington (Chicago, 2008), showcases the unexpected, generative effects of political infighting on Washington march organizing. The book was a finalist for the 2009 Lambda Literary Award for Best Book in LGBT Studies. It won the 2009 Charles Tilly Honorable Mention Award for Best Book from the Collective Behavior and Social Movements section of the American Sociological Association.

Professor Ghaziani has co-edited A Decade of HAART: The Development and Global Impact of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (Oxford, 2008). This book reviews the achievements of HAART over its first decade and explores possible challenges that may arise in the future. It recounts key landmarks in the development and introduction of HAART from the perspective of clinicians, economists, sociologists, and public policy experts. The volume includes a contribution from the co-discoverers of HIV, Luc Montagnier and Robert Gallo.

He also co-edited a special issue in the journal Theory & Society on Measuring Culture. The volume was inspired by a conference of the same name that he organized with John Mohr in 2012 at UBC. The impetus for our gathering was a shared sense that although social scientific studies of “culture” have made great strides on conceptual clarification of the concept (its many meanings), we still have made but little progress on the problem of how to measure it (ways of operationalizing it, determining appropriate indicators for it, breaking it down into observable analytic units, and thus studying it). The issue contains 11 original articles that reflect the dynamism and diversity of the subfield.

Princeton University Press published There Goes the Gayborhood? in 2014 as part of the Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology series. Urban gay districts have long provided sexual minorities with a safe haven in often unsafe world. But as our society accepts gays and lesbians into the mainstream, are “gayborhoods” destined to disappear? This book received an extraordinary amount of international media attention in places such as The American Prospect, The New Yorker, USA Today, Time magazine, the Los Angeles Times, Salon, Vox, Governing magazine, Next City magazine, Standpoint magazine, Vice magazine (Canada, UK, US, and Colombia), the Chicago Tribune, Seattle Times, SF Weekly, Philadelphia Weekly, the Globe & Mail, the National Post, Vancouver Sun, the Advocate, Yahoo News, the Huffington Post, and Andrew Sullivan’s Daily Dish, among others. Professor Ghaziani has also given interviews on BBC Radio 4 (Thinking Allowed), The Monocle Daily (UK), CBC television, CBC radio, and NPR stations in Chicago, Los Angeles, New Zealand, Seattle, Washington DC, and Wisconsin.

In 2016, he co-edited (with Professor Matt Brim at CSI, CUNY) a special issue in the journal WSQ: Women’s Studies Quarterly on Queer Methods. As Queer Studies experiences a methodological renaissance, Professor Ghaziani looks to the ways that the discipline’s resistance, impreciseness, and provocation toward established protocols might affect its development. A growing field within academia, this groundbreaking scholarly collection creates a forum for those in the humanities and social sciences to discuss the challenges of applying traditional research methods to LGBTQ populations.

His most recent book is Sex Cultures, published by Polity Press in 2017. In this project, Professor Ghaziani provides a unique cultural perspective on the study of sexuality. Rather than focusing on sex acts, which make us feel flustered and blind us to a bigger picture, Professor Ghaziani crafts a conversation about sex cultures that zooms in on the diverse contexts that give meaning to our sexual pursuits and practices. Unlike sex, which is a biological expression, the word sexuality highlights how the materiality of the body acquires cultural meaning as it encounters other bodies, institutions, regulations, symbols, societal norms, values, and worldviews. Think of it this way: sex + culture = sexuality.

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