UBC Sociology is hiring for two new tenure-track positions!

UBC Sociology is hiring for two new tenure-track positions!

See job ads for positions as:

1) Head of the Sociology Department and

2) Assistant Professor in Sociology of Family

Prof. Nathan Lauster on CBC “On The Coast” talking about foreign vs. local real estate speculation (1:51:35 mark)

Prof. Nathan Lauster in CBC News

talking about why the focus on foreign buyers as drivers of housing problems is problematic

Watch Michaela Desoucey’s Seminar Series, “Gastropolitics and Contested Tastes” Here

Prof. Lindsey Richardson in The Conversation

talking about addressing socio-economic drivers of overdose risk alongside acute overdose response: “How to stop overdoses? Prevent them to begin with.”

Prof. Nathan Lauster in Metro News

talking about foreign ownership and speculation in housing

Sociology PhD Candidate Zachary Hyde in the Vancouver Courier

talking about the ‘symbolic cannibalism’ of local commercial developments

Undergraduate student Andy Holmes interviewed by Daily Xtra

regarding his research about police in Vancouver’s Pride parade: “Vancouver Pride stands firm in decision to support marginalized LGBT people and ban uniformed police.”

Prof. Anne Martin-Matthews appointed Officer of the Order of Canada!

The Order of Canada is one of the country’s highest civilian honours. Prof. Martin-Matthews was appointed in recognition of her extensive research contributions to the field of gerontology, notably in implementing the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging.

Prof. Nathan Lauster in the Vancouver Sun

talking about the latest data on resident and non-resident owners of dwellings in Vancouver and across Canada

Prof. Nathan Lauster interviewed at the BC Non-Profit Housing Association meetings in Richmond

Prof. Yue Qian interviewed by People Magazine (China)

talking about gender inequality in China (in Chinese)

UBC Public Sociologists: Grad Students David Champagne, Kate Dalrymple, and Biao Zheng Publish Op-eds

Students in Amin Ghaziani’s Qualitative Data Analysis and Professional Writing Seminar respond to the call for a more public sociology by translating—and publishing—the findings of their course-related research in prominent media outlets, including:

David Champagne thinks about green city policies in Canada.

Kate Dalrymple explores how women make decisions about birth control.

Biao Zheng investigates Beijing’s household registration policy and its implication for immigration.

Congratulations David, Kate, and Biao!

Hon Prof. Francesco Duina Op-Ed in the Baltimore Sun “Why are the Poor so Patriotic?”

Hon. Prof. Francesco Duina chats with listeners about his book “Broke & Patriotic”, on Maine Public Radio.

Prof Lindsey Richardson and Post-Doc Jenna van Draanen in The Province

discussing how addressing the overdose crisis means addressing systemic socio-economic issues that increase overdose risk

Prof. Rima Wilkes in Science Magazine:

talking about what career items are on her holiday wish list. Wilkes hopes that “everyone could have that exciting ‘aha’ feeling of discovery that, in my opinion, is the most wonderful part of our job.”

Prof. Phyllis Johnson in the Globe & Mail

talking about the culture that develops around living aboard the International Space Station

Prof. Phyllis Johnson on CBC News talking about her research on being “At Home in Space” (@ 42.00 mark)

Prof. Nathan Lauster on Vancouver Real Estate podcast, talking about the City’s new housing strategy

Prof. Becki Ross on the CBC talking about the Prime Minister’s apology to Canada’s Queer Community

Prof. Phyllis Johnson featured on CBC News

in an article devoted to her project on “At Home in Space”

Prof. Nathan Lauster on Global News talking about Canada’s new National Housing Policy

Prof. Nathan Lauster in the Vancouver Sun

talking with Randy Shore about multigenerational households

Prof. Anne Martin-Matthews has received the Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring (senior category)

Prof. Sylvia Fuller on Roundhouse Radio talking with Gene Valaitis about new policy on immigration, disability, and human rights

Prof. Rima Wilkes in Science Magazine

referencing the colonial origins of Thanksgiving

Prof. Nathan Lauster sees his shadow on National Housing Day

Discussing new national policy and right to housing in The Tyee and new City of Vancouver housing policy in The Vancouver Sun.

See also his earlier commentary on “The Housing Supply Myth” in The Globe & Mail and a follow-up piece in Vancouver’s Metro News.

Missed a Talk? Watch the 2017/2018 Seminar Series Talks here…

 

Gary Fine (Northwestern), Group Pleasures: Collaborative Commitments, Shared Narrative, and the Sociology of Fun

Douglas John McAdam (Stanford), Putting Trump in Historic Perspective: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Postwar America and Today

Clayton Childress (Toronto), Under The Cover: The Creation, Production, and Reception of a Novel

Prof. Nathan Lauster in the Vancouver Sun

discussing rents in Vancouver in global comparison

Prof. Neil Guppy talks to Globe and Mail

about the shelving of UBC’s proposed new freedom of expression statement: “UBC shelves new freedom of expression statement.”

Clayton Childress’ Seminar Series lecture, “Under The Cover: The Creation, Production, and Reception of a Novel,”

is happening Tuesday, October 31st, at 11:00 in room 2107.

Prof. Nathan Lauster talks to Global News about rental affordability

as measured across Metro Vancouver in new Census 2016 results

Prof. Rima Wilkes in Vancouver Sun

On Aboriginal population growth in BC

Prof. Nathan Lauster on CBC Early Edition, talking about Census 2016 figures on renting & owning in Vancouver (1:42:15 mark)

Sociology PhD Candidate Cary Wu interviewed about his award-winning research

on immigration and trust in the Canadian Population Studies newsletter (p. 10-12)

Prof. Nathan Lauster talks about the newest Census data on immigration with local CBC Radio shows across Canada

Including afternoon shows in: Toronto, London, St. John’s, Halifax, New Brunswick, Cape Breton, Saskatchewan, Winnipeg, Yellowknife, Calgary, and Montreal.

PhD Alumni Helen Frouhard-Dourlent on Radio Canada talking about experiences of transgendered people in the health care system. (Scroll down to “Étude sur les transgenres et le système de santé”)

Hon. Prof. Francesco Duina op-ed in both Vancouver Sun & Province “Trump’s simplistic view of trade could hurt everyone”

Prof. Nathan Lauster talks with CBC On The Coast about housing as an election issue in Vancouver (@ 1:40:00 mark)

Prof. Nathan Lauster in Metro News

On housing disputes and evictions from “illegal” secondary suites in Surrey

Interested in a Minor in Family Studies? Learn more about the program here

Prof. Nathan Lauster on Roundhouse Radio with Gene Valaitis talking about what’s going on in Vancouver’s bedrooms

Prof. Nathan Lauster talking with Roundhouse Radio’s “Real Estate Therapist” about housing

UBC Sociologists Nathan Lauster and Julian Dierkes featured in Vancouver Sun

On why Vancouver has so many mansions, and how people are finding creative ways to use them.

Prof. Rima Wilkes featured in Science Magazine,

talking about how to budget your grant proposal.

Prof. Nathan Lauster in CBC News Analysis

discussing the problematic nature of Canada’s National Occupancy Standards for bedroom sharing

Prof. Richard Carpiano on CBC News

talking about burnout in the workplace

Sociology Street-Runners – race and raise funds for downtown Eastside

Members of the Department of Sociology competed on Saturday in the Eastside 10K, a charity run that generates donations towards key organizations in the Downtown Eastside. Congrats Sociology faculty and staff!

Save

Prof. Seth Abrutyn has been elected

to the American Sociological Review editorial board for a three year term.

Prof. Catherine Corrigall-Brown talks about igniting a passion through her teaching for UBC Arts

UBC Sociology is hiring two tenure track positions:

in Sociology of Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Sociology. Deadline Sept. 15th. Click on a position for more details.

Prof. Nathan Lauster in The Globe & Mail

talking about how people fit all their stuff into apartments in Vancouver

Prof. Sylvia Fuller interviewed by Chatelaine on why most women would not want to take their boss’s job.

Fuller said “organizations are demanding a lot more of their workers, without a whole lot of recognition or loyalty on the employers’ part.”

Prof. Amin Ghaziani in the Metro Vancouver

talking about how to make cities safe for a diverse range of LGBTQ people

Prof. Nathan Lauster in the Comox Valley Record

talking about the area’s high proportion of single-person households

Important Dates

January 2018

Tues 16    Faculty Meeting (2107) 11:00 – 12:30
Thurs 25  Canvas Workshop #1, for Faculty (2107) 12:00 – 1:30
Tues 30    Seminar Series Speaker: Olli Pyyhtinen (U of Tampere) (2107) 11:00 – 12:30

February

Thurs 26  Canvas Workshop #2, for Faculty (2107) 11:00 – 12:30
Tues 6     Seminar Series Speaker: Viviane Namaste (Concordia) (134) 11:00 – 12:30  (Kaspar Naegele Memorial Lecture, 2018) Reception to follow, in the Lino Lounge.
Mon 12   University Closed (Family Day)
Tues 13   Faculty Meeting (2107) 11:00 – 12:30
19 – 23     Reading Break

March

Tues 6     Seminar Series Speaker: Laura Hamilton (EC Merced) (134) 11:00 – 12:30
Tues 13   Faculty Meeting (2107) 11:00 – 12:30
Fri 30      University Closed (Good Friday)

April

Mon 2       University Closed (Easter Monday)
Tues 3       Seminar Series Speaker: Paula England (NYU) (134) 11:00 – 12:30
Fri 6          End of Winter Session – Term 2
Tues 10    Faculty Meeting (2107) 11:00 – 12:30
10 – 25       Winter Session Term 2 Examination Period
Sun 27      Vancouver SunRun 10K (UBCSociology competes!) 9:00 a.m.

Prof. Rima Wilkes is interviewed by the Vancouver Courier on the effectiveness of counter-protests.

Wilkes said such protests are effective in sending a message through the media but ineffective at creating dialogue between opposing groups: “Are counter-protests effective?”

Prof. Catherine Corrigall-Brown on Counter-protests in Vancouver (@ 1.15 mark)

Prof. Rima Wilkes on CBC Early Edition talking about offensive memorials (1:42:25 mark)

A WORLD-CLASS REPUTATION

UBC ranks among the top 40 universities in the world and Sociology has an award-winning record, including 2017 Killam Teaching Awards: for Prof. Catherine Corrigall-Brown, Ph.D Candidate Nicole Malette, and Prof. Silvia Bartolic.

INVESTIGATING
THE SOCIAL

Structure and Construction, Process and Change: courses in Sociology are ideal for students interested in understanding how everyday life gets put together and how it might be altered for the better.

Prof. Seth Abrutyn has won the Children and Youth section’s Outstanding Scholarly Contribution award,

as well as the Mental Health section’s Best Publication award at the 2017 annual ASA Conference for his paper, “Adolescents under Pressure: A New Durkheimian Framework for Understanding Adolescent Suicide in a Cohesive Community.”

Prof. Lindsey Richardson has received the 2017 Junior Scholar Award from the American Sociological Association’s Alcohol, Drugs and Tobacco Section.

The award is given in recognition of research contributions within sociology and the demonstration of independent research to a scholar who has defended their dissertation within the past five years. Prof. Richardson received the award at this year’s annual ASA meeting.

UBC at the 112th ASA Annual Meeting

View UBC’s participation in the ASA Annual Meeting, taking place from August 11th to August 16th in Montréal.

PhD Candidate Cary Wu received a doctoral fellowship (US$18,000) from The Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange (CCKF).

The CCKF Fellowship is awarded to Doctoral Candidates in the humanities and social sciences who are completing the last stage of their Ph.D. research and writing their dissertations.

Prof. Rima Wilkes is interviewed by MacLean’s Magazine on the rise of Canadian birthing hotels.

Professor Wilkes discusses how racism may be a factor in some of the protests against the hotels: “Why women are using birthing hotels in Canada”

Prof. Nathan Lauster Quoted by the Tyee

discussing affordable housing and expense-to-income measures: “What do we mean by ‘affordable housing?”

Prof. Lindsey Richardson has been awarded a CIHR Foundation Grant

for her research, entitled “Addressing the health impacts of poverty and socio-economic marginalization among people who use illicit drugs.” Professor Richardson was awarded one of 76 awards nationally, of which only 13 were awarded to early career investigators. She will receive $1,174,200 over five years to fund her research. Read more about Foundation grants and the competition results.

 

UBC Sociology Professors Ghaziani, Lauster, & Qian in the news talking about the latest Census data

 

Below are the links to the media coverage in which UBC Professors Amin Ghaziani, Nathan Lauster and Yue Qian have been cited speaking about the latest census data.

 

Nathan Lauster and Yue Qian Cited in Vancouver Sun:

Census 2016: A rise and changes in one-person households

Nathan Lauster in the Vancouver Metro:

Young adults living with parents on the rise – culture and economics at play say experts

Nathan Lauster in the Vancouver Courier:

In your 20s and living with your parents? You’re not alone

Amin Ghaziani in Surrey Now-Leader:

Same-sex marriages rise, as gaybourhoods change

Amin Ghaziani on the BC Almanac edition of CBC:

Families, households and couples. LGBTQ+ and refugees.

Yue Qian on CBC News:

What’s behind the trend of one-person households?

 

 

 

 

 

Prof. Nathan Lauster on CBC Early Edition talking about the rise of living alone (2:20:18 mark)

Prof. Yue Qian on CBC, talking about living alone and the newest Census results

Prof. Yue Qian on CBC News Network talking about the rising trend of one-person households in Canada.

Prof. Amin Ghaziani on CBC’s BC Almanac talking about Census 2016 and Same-sex Couples in Canada (11:42 minute mark).

RESEARCH THAT MAKES AN IMPACT

UBC Sociology is a research powerhouse by any measure. Professor Lindsey Richardson is examining how changes to income assistance programs might reduce drug use and drug related harms like overdose that spike every month around “cheque day” in Vancouver and BC.

Prof. Amin Ghaziani interviewed by a men’s lifestyle magazine in Santa Monica, CA

for a feature on gayborhoods in a post-gay, Post-Orlando world: “The Gayborhood in a Post-Gay, Post-Orlando World.”


Job Posting: Assistant Professor, Sociology of Indigenous Peoples (tenure-track)

The Department of Sociology invites applications for one full-time, tenure-track Assistant Professor position.

Professor Position:

Assistant Professor: Sociology of Indigenous Peoples (tenure-track)
Deadline Sept 15, 2017 (Begins July 1, 2018)

The Department of Sociology in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver) invites applications for a tenure-stream faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning July 1, 2018.  The candidate will have a record of demonstrated excellence or exceptional promise in research and teaching in the Sociology of Indigenous Peoples.  The Department is especially interested in attracting candidates with diverse backgrounds and interests who will be capable of successfully working with a multicultural and multiethnic student population and who are committed to working with indigenous students and communities.  We encourage all qualified candidates, particularly Indigenous scholars, to apply.  Visit soci.ubc.ca for information about the Department.

We expect applicants to have a Ph.D. in sociology or cognate discipline at the time of appointment and demonstrate a record of excellent research and teaching. Applicants who have progressed to the point where completion of the Ph.D. is imminent and who demonstrate clear promise of excellent research and teaching may also be considered.

We ask interested individuals to submit a CV; a cover letter describing their interest in the position and fit with the department; a 1-2 page teaching statement accompanied by evidence of teaching effectiveness; a 1-2 page research statement; a 1 page statement identifying the applicant’s contributions, or potential contributions, to diversity, along with their ability to work with a culturally diverse student body.

Applications should be submitted online by September 15, 2017 at the UBC Faculty Careers website  (www.facultycareers.ubc.ca/27147). Please be prepared to upload application materials in the order noted above. Please also have three referees send confidential supporting letters by the same deadline via email to soci.head(at)ubc.ca with the applicant’s name in the subject line. Review of applications will begin after the closing date and will continue until the position is filled. Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Vancouver is routinely ranked among the top five most livable cities in the world. It is renowned for its mild year-round climate, unique urban design, emphasis on the environment and sustainability, low crime rates, cultural and cosmopolitan offerings, ethnic diversity, and spectacular natural beauty set among the coastal mountains and the Pacific Ocean.  As the major public research university in western Canada, the University of British Columbia is also a globally acclaimed institution that ranks among the top thirty universities in the world. We rank in the top two Sociology departments in Canada.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Métis, Inuit, or Indigenous person. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

Prof. Nathan Lauster quoted in Globe & Mail

on new housing options in Vancouver’s former single-family neighbourhoods

Prof. Nathan Lauster on CBC’s “On The Coast” talking about Vancouver’s new residential options (around the 53 min. mark)

Prof. Yue Qian in the Globe and Mail

re “How a little brown book can keep China’s lovers worlds apart”

Prof. Ghaziani featured in the Voice of San Diego

about patterns in the urban location of lesbians and gay men.

PhD student Kaitlyn Jaffe has been awarded a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship.

Vanier Scholars demonstrate leadership skills and a high standard of scholarly achievement in graduate studies in the social sciences and/or humanities, natural sciences and/or engineering and health. Jaffe’s funding will be coming from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), amounting to $50,000 per year for 3 years.

 

Read more about the Vanier Scholarship here and here.

MA student Kelsea Perry has won the UBC Affiliate Award.

The award, based on academic excellence, is worth $16,000.

Visiting Professors Policy

Goals:

  1. Ensure a diverse group of visiting professors to the department, in terms of geography and areas of expertise.
  2. Ensure that visiting professors feel welcome and supported during their stay.
  3. Ensure that the department benefits from their visit.

Guidelines listed below are all based on ensuring that we meet these 3 goals.

Selection of visitors

Priority when selecting visitors will be given to:

  1. Visitors who are collaborating with members of the department.
  2. Visiting Professors, those who have positions from which they are leaving and to which they will return after the visit.
  3. Visitors from diverse geographical regions and areas of expertise and who complement the interests and strengths of the department.
  4. Visitors who are staying for a length of time of between 6 months to 1 year.

Requirements of visitors

Each visitor must:

  1. Provide a CV and letter of application.
  2. Provide references when applying.
  3. Be approved by the visiting faculty committee.
  4. Cover the costs of their visa and other administrative costs.
  5. Give a talk in the department.

Requirements of the department

The department will provide the following:

  1. Office space. Given limited office space, we can only host 2-3 visitors at a time.
  2. University resources, as approved by faculty relations (library access, etc.)
  3. Invitations to department events (lectures, social events, etc.)
  4. Facilitation of scholarly interaction (committee members and anyone else who is interested will meet with scholars on a regular basis, help make introductions across campus, etc.)

 

Adopted in full by Faculty vote, January 17, 2017

Department of Sociology Faculty Workload Policy

The workload guidelines outline minimum expectations for faculty members of the Department of Sociology. All faculty members should contribute to the department through some combination of teaching, research, educational leadership, and academic and community service activities. The precise balance of these contributions will vary from faculty member to faculty member, and the guidelines aim to recognize differences in individual circumstances by delineating exceptions to these minimum expectations in each area of core responsibility. The guidelines are provided with an understanding that there will be slight variations year over year and between faculty members.


Classroom Instruction

Degree program instruction forms a key component of the Sociology Department’s core mission and it is fundamentally important and expected that all Sociology Faculty members engage in high-quality classroom teaching.

Research Stream Expectations

Research Stream Faculty members will teach 3 Sociology courses, or 9 credits per academic year, subject to the following principles:

  •  For the purposes of this guideline, one class represents three credits and approximately 39 direct student contact hours.
  •  Faculty should aim to teach two larger 100, 200 or 300 level courses and one 400 or 500 level smaller course.
  •  Faculty should teach approximately 175 students per academic year, averaged over a three-year period.
  •  Faculty should teach a minimum of 2 undergraduate courses.
  •  Teaching duties for which additional pay is offered will not be counted toward classroom teaching expectations.

Educational Leadership Stream Expectations

Educational Leadership Stream Faculty members will teach 5 Sociology courses, or 15 credits per academic year, subject to the following principles:

  •  For the purposes of this guideline, one class represents three credits and approximately 39 direct student contact hours.
  •  Faculty should teach a minimum of 4 undergraduate courses.
  •  Faculty should aim to teach approximately 300 students per academic year, averaged over a three-year period.
  •  Teaching duties for which additional pay is offered will not be counted toward classroom teaching expectations.

Exceptions

A number of factors will determine exceptions to the above classroom teaching expectations. For example, faculty wishing to teach smaller courses may teach an additional three credit course to distribute the same number of students across more courses. Final decisions with respect to course assignments will be the responsibility of the Department Head.

The exceptions outlined below may reduce the expected teaching commitment of Faculty by one three-credit course per academic year. These exceptions are not additive and a combination of these roles or other exceptions will not result in a teaching load reduction below 2 courses of classroom instruction per academic year.

  • Significant administrative roles: Major administrative roles constitute exceptional service to the department and are accompanied by a one-course release. These roles include: Graduate Studies Chair, Undergraduate Studies Chair and Editor for a major sociology journal. The Department Head may make an equivalent determination for other administrative roles on a case-by-case basis.
  •  Research Chairs, salary or other awards that have require reduced teaching loads: Examples include, but are not limited to, Canada Research Chairs, CIHR New Investigator Awards, and MSFHR Scholar Awards.
  • Course buyouts: Some internal awards and external funding agencies provide funds to divert time from teaching to research activities. Faculty can buy out one course per academic year at a cost of $15K. Final decisions with respect to course buyouts will be the responsibility of the Department Head.

The exceptions outlined below may reduce the expected teaching commitment of Faculty below 175 students per academic year.

  • Unique Curricular Needs: Faculty may be asked by the Department Head to teach smaller courses providing a service to the Department or enhanced learning opportunities. These requests may result in teaching less than 175 students.
  • Graduate Teaching: Faculty teaching a graduate course will likely teach less than 175 students.

The factors below would reduce the expected teaching commitment of Faculty below the minimum expectations.

  • Faculty members on sabbatical leave, medical leave, administrative leave, or secondments within and/or outside of UBC.
  • Faculty members with reduced or joint appointments, who will have proportional reductions in classroom teaching expectations.
  • Faculty members with exceptional circumstances, as approved by the Department Head.

Research Stream Expectations

As a research-intensive department within the Faculty of Arts, all Professoriate Stream Faculty are expected to be actively seeking funding, conducting, and publishing the results of scholarly investigations.

All Sociology Faculty in the Research Stream are expected to:

  • Maintain an active portfolio of research projects;
  • Actively seek peer-reviewed competitive funding if/as necessary to support their research projects. This should include funding as principal investigator; and
  • Publish the results of their studies in peer-reviewed scholarly journals or in books published through scholarly presses on a regular basis. This should include manuscripts as lead or senior author.

Educational Leadership Stream Expectations

Educational Leadership Stream Faculty are expected to excel beyond the normal requirements of excellent teaching with impact beyond one’s own classroom – within the Department, University, and in the broader academic community.

All Sociology Faculty in the Educational Leadership Stream are expected to:

  • Make contributions to curriculum development and renewal;
  • Provide leadership through teaching and learning initiatives and through mentorship;
  • Pursue activities that support evidence-based educational excellence, leadership and impact within and beyond the university; and
  • Obtain funding for educational improvements through grants such as TLEF if/as necessary to support projects.

Academic Service

All Sociology Faculty are expected to engage in service within the Department, the UBC community and the broader scholarly community. At a minimum, Faculty within Sociology should be engaged in the following academic service activities:

  • Attend the following meetings:
    • Sociology Faculty meetings
    • Appointments, Reappointments, Promotion, and Tenure Committee meetings
  • Maintain active participation in service to the University, including:
    • Active participation in at least one non-compulsory Sociology Committee (e.g. graduate committee or workshops & seminar series).
    • Active participation in at least one additional UBC committee at the Sociology, Faculty of Arts, or UBC level.

Community Service and Knowledge Dissemination

Sociology faculty are also expected to undertake meaningful engagement in the broader academic and non-academic community, such as scholarly societies, conference leadership and community engagement, including knowledge dissemination to policy makers and/or communication with the general public.

Exceptions

Factors that might lead to a lower service commitment include:

  • Faculty members on sabbatical leave, medical leave, administrative leaves, or secondments within and/or outside of UBC.
  • Faculty members with reduced or joint appointments, who will have proportional reduced expectations.

 

Adopted in full by Faculty vote, April 12, 2016

Undergraduate student Vahid Rashidi has been accepted to present at the Eighth International Conference on Sport and Society.

The proposal is titled “Tractor Sazi F.C. and the Civil Rights Movement of Turks in Iranian Azerbaijan.” The conference will be at Imperial College of London, United Kingdom between 10–11 July 2017.

Website
Accepted Proposal
Conference Program

 

Prof. Rima Wilkes was interviewed for a Canadian Press story

about the Canada 150 celebrations: “For many, Canada 150 celebrations pale in comparison to Expo 67.”

The interview appears in CTV News, National Post, 660 News and other Postmedia outlets.

UBC’s Urban Ethnographic Field School takes learning out of the classroom and into Vancouver’s diverse communities

Co-taught by Prof. Kerry Greer, the course gives students an opportunity to work with a community organization while conducting ethnographic research. Students collaborate with a partner agency to work on projects that help to promote the organization’s mission, while reflecting on social, economic and political issues in the Downtown Eastside.

PhD Student Kaitlyn Jaffe has received the Public Scholars Initiative award.

The award is given to those whose work is of significant merit and has potential to advance scholarship in the public interest. It also includes a $5000 research allowance.

Astronaut Thomas Pesquet describes the importance of Prof. Phyllis Johnson’s research project, “At Home In Space,” from inside the International Space Station!

Job Posting: Assistant Professor, Environmental Sociology, tenure-track

The Department of Sociology invites applications for one full-time, tenure-track Assistant Professor position.

Professor Position:

Assistant Professor: Environmental Sociology (tenure-track)
Deadline Sept 15, 2017 (Begins July 1, 2018)

The Department of Sociology in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver) invites applications for a tenure-stream faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning July 1, 2018. The substantive area of specialization is environmental sociology. The Department is especially interested in attracting candidates with diverse backgrounds and interests, who will be capable of successfully working with a multicultural and multiethnic student population. For information about the Department, visit: http://soci.ubc.ca/.

We expect applicants to have a Ph.D. in sociology at the time of appointment and demonstrate a record of excellent research and teaching. Applicants who have progressed to the point where completion of the Ph.D. is imminent and who demonstrate clear promise of excellent research and teaching may also be considered.

We ask interested individuals to submit a CV; a cover letter describing their interest in the position and fit with the department; a 1-2 page teaching statement accompanied by evidence of teaching effectiveness; a 1-2 page research statement; a 1 page statement identifying the applicant’s contributions, or potential contributions, to diversity, along with their ability to work with a culturally international student body; and two sample publications. Applications should be submitted online by September 15, 2017 at the UBC Faculty Careers website (www.facultycareers.ubc.ca/26848). Please be prepared to upload application materials in the order noted above. Please also have three referees send confidential supporting letters by the same deadline via email to soci.head(at)ubc.ca with the applicant’s name in the subject line. Review of applications will begin after the closing date and will continue until the position is filled. Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Vancouver is routinely ranked among the top five most livable cities in the world. It is renowned for its mild year-round climate, unique urban design, emphasis on the environment and sustainability, low crime rates, cultural and cosmopolitan offerings, ethnic diversity, and spectacular natural beauty set among the coastal mountains and the Pacific Ocean. As the major public research university in western Canada, the University of British Columbia is also a globally acclaimed institution that ranks among the top thirty universities in the world. We rank in the top two Sociology departments in Canada.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Métis, Inuit, or Indigenous person. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

PhD Candidate Cary Wu received Chinese Government Award for Outstanding Students Abroad.

This award includes a $6,000 prize and a CSC-issued cetificate. It was set up by the China Scholarship Council (CSC) to encourage research excellence and to recognize the achievements among Chinese students abroad.

Procedures W2017 For Faculty

This document clarifies procedures and practices followed in the Department of Sociology. It is meant to provide guidance to Faculty members, providing a helpful reference and ensure transparency, fairness and equity in how we deal with each other, with our staff and students, and with other units on campus. Senate Policies (as set out in the UBC Calendar) as well as policies governed by our Faculty (Faculty of Arts) are expected to be followed by all Department members.

For All Sociology Administrative Resources: connect.ubc.ca to access STAR (Sociology Teaching & Academic Repository) & ADMINISTRATIVE RESOURCES. (Soon to be migrated to CANVAS platform)

The material is divided into 4 sections: teaching, research, administration, and health & safety.

1. TEACHING

Given the expectations at a leading research-intensive university, the Faculty of Arts expects all research stream faculty to teach four courses per year, all educational leadership stream faculty to teach six courses per year, and all lecturers to teach eight courses per year.  The Department reduces the teaching load of all research stream and educational leadership stream faculty by one course per year (for more detail see the Department of Sociology Workload Policy).

The Department head allocates teaching responsibilities in consultation with faculty members, and the Undergraduate Sociology committee. The following principles and sentiments guide this allocation:

  1. Each faculty member is encouraged to teach large first-year and second-year courses.
  2. We try to balance the demands of teaching evenly among faculty members. Specifically, and in the interest of equity and fairness, it is expected that faculty combine teaching in large courses (100-level to 300-level) with teaching in small fourth year courses and graduate courses (in rotation). As a typical minimum in one academic year (and averaged over a three-year period), faculty will teach approximately 175 undergraduate students (e.g., 100 in term 1 and 75 in term 2).
  3. Sessional instructors teach more students because they do not have formal research and administrative obligations.
  4. At the graduate level - we strive for a balance between continuity (teaching one course at least twice in succession), and rotation of faculty members into (and out of) courses.
  5. All faculty members are encouraged to teach a required undergraduate course (Sociology 100, 101, 102, 200, 217, 310, 328, 370, 371, 372, 380, 381, 382, 383, 414, 415, or 469; Family Studies 200, 238) and/or a required graduate course (Sociology 500, 501, 502, 503, 508, 514) on a regular basis.
  6. The allocation of teaching must also reflect ongoing research and service commitments. This may mean some release from teaching for research or heavy service commitments (e.g., Department Head).
  7. Faculty members are encouraged to supervise at least one Honours student every year or two.
  8. We expect all faculty members to share equally in the supervision of graduate students (with no one having more than five fulltime primary supervisions in any particular year).
  9. We expect faculty members to serve on PhD comprehensive examination committees when asked.

Sessional Instructors teach a significant number of courses in the Department. The Department takes the following steps in the assignment of courses which are consistent with the procedures outlined in the UBC Faculty Association ‘Collective Agreement 2012-2014’ (or subsequent versions):

  1. We first assign courses to regular faculty.
  2. We then assign courses to Continuing-Status Sessionals based on their individual course load entitlements. (If the winter session does not provide them with the full teaching load to which they are entitled, they have first priority for summer courses for which they are qualified.)
  3. The Head determines the remaining courses allocations using the Sessional Pool (Continuing-Status and Non-Continuing-Status Sessionals), ‘Externals’ (adjuncts, clinical, honorary, visitors, post-doctoral fellows, and post retirement appointees), and graduate students.  This decision can change from year to year, depending upon factors such as who is available to teach, current Departmental needs, and the best interests of the students.  We expect to allocate each Non-Continuing Sessional to teach one course from the Sessional Pool per academic year. We assign remaining courses to Sessionals with less than a full-time course load and to first-time Applicants. If no Sessionals apply within the stated posting deadline a course may be assigned to Externals.
  4. Occasionally courses become available at an irregular time. We advertise these courses and Sessionals with less than full-time appointments will have first priority to such courses.
  5. PhD students who have advanced to candidacy are encouraged to seek teaching experience and the Department will, in accord with the Collective Agreement, seek to find them opportunities (PhD students who are offered teaching positions are considered Sessionals under the Collective Agreement).

  1. We assign TA's based on course design, course enrollment and TA expertise.
  2. Priority for teaching assistants, where possible, will be given to junior faculty (i.e., pre-tenure).
  3. We will make every effort to match the training and expertise of a prospective Teaching Assistant to the course in question.
  4. Faculty instructors are encouraged to communicate their needs for a TA, and their preferences for particular Teaching Assistants.
  5. Teaching Assistants are covered by a collective agreement and the terms and conditions of that Agreement must be respected.
  6. Faculty are required to ensure their TAs do not work beyond the 192 hour maximum nor work beyond end of Term date (April 30 for Term 1 / December 31 for Term 2).

Working with Teaching Assistants

Teaching assistants (TA's), both undergraduate and graduate, play a valuable role in enhancing student learning in our courses. Faculty need to ensure that TAs are well versed in our individual expectations, and have the support necessary to do an effective job. Teaching Assistants work under a collective agreement. First, they are expected to work a maximum of 192 hours per term (12 hours per week for 16 weeks). Second, the agreement allows for some ‘banking’ of hours across time periods although it is neither possible nor fair to ask TA's to do the vast majority of their hours in one or two discrete time periods (e.g., 80 hours in last two weeks of the exam period). Third, the Department uses a form ‘Teaching Assistant Duties and Hours’ to ensure we have transparency about expectations of hours and duties of TAs. This form is retained in the Students Services office. The Student Services secretary will distribute this form before the term commences. It is important that students in all courses know exactly who is marking what (i.e., TAs or faculty members). Also, aside from Sociology 100 level courses and very large 200 level courses (N>100), normal practice in the Department is to have the faculty instructor be responsible for assigning the final grades on a majority of student work. TAs should not be expected to do all of the marking in any course.

Supervisors of ALL TAs are required to conduct an evaluation of their TA prior to the final exam or April 30th. The Student Services office will email Instructors a link to the evaluation. The purpose of this evaluation is help determine future hiring.

Information about academic integrity (plagiarism, etc.), as well as course organization and planning, guidelines for grading, student evaluations, etc., is available on the Faculty of Arts website  at www.arts.ubc.ca.  Click on the ‘Faculty & Staff’ link then ‘Arts Internal Resources’ and log into the site via your CWL. Throughout the year students may experiencing various types of difficulty and be asking you about Academic Concessions. Students should be referred to Arts Advising for all Academic Concessions – they need to fill out a ‘Request for Academic Concession’ form. Forward the student this link: http://students.arts.ubc.ca/advising/academic-performance/help-academic-concession/. The Academic Concession policy exists to help with fairness.

The primary method of distributing materials to your students is through Canvas.

All courses have their own website, which is a key resource to enable you to make course material available to your students via the web, as well as provide a venue for paper submissions, on-line discussions, student progress reports, and other course-related matters. To get your course set up for this service, send an email to arts.helpdesk@ubc.ca, with your name, course number, and CWL username.

If you have any questions, please contact the Arts ISIT Help Desk at 7-2787 or arts.helpdesk@ubc.ca

Students have a right to know about our expectations for them in the courses we teach. Providing detailed course information is expected. This should include both of the following, concise course descriptions and detailed course outlines.

Outline of Syllabus These one-page descriptions provide succinct information to a variety of people including interested students, school advisors, and university exchange officers.  They are posted on the Student Service Centre web site. The Outline of Syllabus includes course description, probable method of evaluation, and probable text books. The purpose of the Outline of Syllabus is to provide these details prior to the availability of a formal course outline. Please email descriptions to the Student Services secretary at  soci.ugrad@ubc.ca,

Course Outline (or course syllabus) The Course Outline serves as a kind of contract. These should provide detailed information for, and be distributed to, all students enrolled in a course. At a minimum, course outlines should contain contact information, course locations, required readings, evaluation criteria, and deadlines. Please see examples of effective course outlines available from the Student Services Office.  Consider posting your outline on your course website and not printing out copies for every student.  Please email your course outline to the Student Services Secretary at soci.ugrad@ubc.ca

Submission of papers: Please communicate to your students that they are to hand in their papers either in hard copy - in class or directly to you or the course TA or the ANSO Paper Drop Box located near the door to the mail room - or electronically via Connect/Canvas. Please inform students clearly of your procedure. Never ask students to put their paper in your mail box nor to drop them off in the Main Office. Students should retain a copy of any paper they submit.

Returning papers: Faculty are obligated to ensure papers are returned to students in a method that is convenient and secure for their students, while at the same time not being a drain on staff time (i.e. papers should not be handed to staff to distribute). Faculty should inform students of how they will return papers.

Student wellbeing is fundamental to the aspirations of UBC’s campus community and pivotal to student learning and success.  We recognize that, throughout a student’s time at UBC, there are multiple ways in which their success may be impeded. This includes challenges associated with their transition to UBC, financial resources, academic and career aspirations, as well as mental and physical health. In support of this goal, UBC has launched ‘Early Alert’, a website where faculty and staff can identify their concerns about students who are facing difficulties. This gives students the earliest possible connection to the right resources and support, before difficulties put their academic success at risk.  More information for faculty, staff, and students is available on the Early Alert website: www.earlyalert.ubc.ca

The text below is provided as an example for you to paste into your course outline, so that students are aware that this service may be used, either by you or them.

‘Early Alert’ (earlyalert.ubc.ca)
During the term, I will do my best to reach out and offer support If I am concerned about your academic performance or wellbeing. I also encourage you to come and speak with me if you need assistance. In addition, I may identify my concerns using Early Alert. The program allows academic, financial, or mental health concerns to be identified sooner and responded to in a more coordinated way. This provides you with the earliest possible connection to resources like academic advising, financial advising, counselling, or other resources and support to help you get back on track. The information is treated confidentially and is sent because I care about your academic success and wellbeing. For more information, please visit earlyalert.ubc.ca.

We have become more successful in avoiding appeals on purely technical grounds because faculty have been putting more of their assignments, deadlines, and other course requirements in writing. Provided faculty scrupulously observe their own requirements, and the requirements are clear, fewer students appeal on the grounds that the instructor did not tell them something.

UBC expects all students to be competent writers and it is part of our job as instructors to help in this effort. Literacy should be evaluated as part of all exams and papers. Please make requirements clear, and take a class session in each course to outline the basic rules for writing essays, preparing footnotes, using quotations, etc.

Courses in Sociology are graded as the chart below illustrates:

Percent (%) Letter Grade
90-100   A+
85-89   A
80-84   A-
76-79   B+
72-75   B
68-71

 

64-67

  B-

 

C+

60-63   C
55-59   C-
50-54   D
0-49   F (fail)

In undergraduate courses please operate on the assumption that ‘A’ grades (80% and above) are for outstanding work only. Good, solid but unexceptional work should be given a ‘B’ grade (68%-79%), and ‘C’ is an acceptable grade (> 67%) and not a penalty. Remember the average grade in Social Science Departments in the Faculty of Arts for 100 level courses is in the 70-73% range, an average that rises to about 77-80% in 400 level courses.

Experience shows that grades falling at the top of the ranges in the above table often lead to student appeals.

Grading practices attempt to asses all students fairly in relation to other students in the same class, students in other sections of the same course, and students in other courses. Results in an average class of reasonable size will normally fall somewhere within the following broad limits:

  • Grade ‘A’ between 5% and 25% of class
  • Grades ‘A’ & ‘B’ combined not over 75% of class
  • Grade ‘F’ not over 20% of class

Experienced instructors with challenging course material and rigorous but fair grading practices find that final grades normally conform to the above distribution pattern. Undoubtedly there will be courses in which these guidelines need to be flexible, but in such cases it is imperative that the instructor provide a convincing rationale for an exception (e.g., poorly prepared students and therefore many failures; or small seminar open only to honours students; or a course that filled on the first day of registration – given that registration dates for students are driven by their grades).

Enter grades on-line on the Faculty Service Centre (FSC) system. If you have questions or need help with this please email them at sis.support@ubc.ca. Grade distributions will be discussed as necessary with individual instructors and/or in Department meetings. This procedure is followed to help us ensure that we do not have grades submitted that fail to conform to guidelines.

Grade Entry Deadlines: Grades are due 7 business days following the date the examination was held, or 5 business days following, in the case of examinations written on the last 2 days of the examination period.

Unless granted prior approval by the Head, and with the exception of courses in statistics, the ‘essay format’ must constitute at least half of evaluation criteria in all Sociology courses, and especially all upper level courses. In ‘essay format’ we include the following: term papers, proposals, project reports, laboratory reports, book reviews, and exam answers requiring discursive prose.

All graduate student programs are approved by the Sociology Graduate Studies Committee. This committee will also ask all faculty members for a status report on graduate student progress. For details, please see the Student Services secretary (soci.grad@ubc.ca).

Faculty members are expected, as part of their normal responsibilities, to supervise graduate students. To optimize the quality of advising, faculty members should not act as the primary supervisor for more than five graduate students at any one time.

(Soci 433 or 598) If you agree to offer a reading course (private tutorial) you must obtain a "Directed Study Form" from the Student Services Office. The student and instructor should complete the form and return it to the Head for approval. Registration in directed studies courses is blocked so that only students with approval may register. After approval, the student will be registered by the Student Services secretary.

(Soci 449) If you agree to supervise an Honours student you must obtain an "Honours Thesis Form" from the Student Services Office. The student and instructor should complete the form and return it to the Student Services secretary (who in turn will have it approved by the Sociology Undergraduate Studies Committee, or a representative of the committee). Registration in the Honours program is blocked so that only students with approval may register. After approval, the student will be registered by the Student Services secretary. Guidelines for the Honours program are detailed in “B.A. Sociology Honours Program” available from the Student Services secretary.

Please make full use of the formal examination periods, in December and in April as well as in both of the summer terms. All courses designed for first and second year students should hold exams unless the Dean or Head, for sound academic reasons, grant an exemption.

You must schedule exams in the formal examination period at the end of terms (check calendar for exact dates). Instructors may not hold any exams, formal or informal, during the two weeks preceding the formally scheduled exams of December and April. This is true too of the week prior to the formal exam periods in the summer (typically in June and August). (The recommendation does not apply to regular weekly or bi-weekly tests or to traditional and current practices in laboratories). For further information on Senate Policy on Examinations, please see: http://www.students.ubc.ca/calendar/index.cfm?tree=3,41,89,0

Invigilation of exams. Each exam room requires one head invigilator to be in charge of setup and problems – normally, the instructor of the course. You will invigilate your own exams and be available for the entire examination period. Further details can be found on the UBC Scheduling Services website: http://www.students.ubc.ca/classroomservices/course-and-exam-scheduling/exam-scheduling/winter-session-exam-invigilation/

The Department is required to maintain a complete file for all completed courses. These are necessary in the event of student appeals, as well as for maintaining general departmental records. Once a course is completed, please send the following materials to the Student Services secretary:  Course syllabus, Assignment sheets, Exams, Grading Criteria, Breakdown of grade for each student, Final Grade Sheets.

Under University regulations, student evaluations are required for every course (of any credit value). The only exception relates to courses with individual students (e.g., Soci 449; Soci 598). The Faculty of Arts uses an on-line standardized evaluation process. It is up to the Faculty member to retain all evaluations, for use by PAT committees or in rehiring (in the case of non-tenure track instructors, sessionals, etc.).

For purposes both of sessional review and for reappointment, promotion and tenure, senior colleagues in the Department will conduct a peer review of teaching which will include a review of course objectives, content, structure, and evaluation methods (through review of print materials) and class visits, arranged cooperatively by the reviewer(s) and reviewee. Non-Department reviewers will be included as part of the peer of review of teaching process. Colleagues should anticipate that an external reviewer will join colleagues from the Department in conducting class visits and commenting on course materials (e.g., syllabus, evaluation methods).

The Department is fortunate enough to have a Reference Librarian (Sheryl Adam, sgadam@mail.ubc.ca) who is available to assist faculty with the following:

  • Current Awareness for your Desktop via RSS. Set up a (free) RSS reader and subscribe to feeds from your favourite journals (table of contents), databases (results of a particular search), newspapers, government announcements, blogs, whatever you need.
  • Course Pages – via Canvas – for your course.
  • Journal and book suggestions are always welcome. Your recommendations help the library allocate resources to where they will be used. Please let Sheryl know if there are any journals that the library should add to their list of possible subscriptions, and/or any books or other materials that would assist you and your students in their research.

  • Faculty may request one additional course release through a course buyout. To request this course release, faculty should be ready to buy out their course with $15K. Money for buyouts can come from different places, including internally (for instance, UBC in return for serving on SAC) and salary awards.
  • Releases already built in a faculty contract/offer letter will be honored.
  • For more details on course releases, see the Department of Sociology Workload Policy.

The Department will pay guest speakers a stipend of up to $100. Please note that guest speakers typically do not require or request a stipend if public relations is part of their profession. Stipends are intended for special circumstances only. Approval is required from the Department Head prior to inviting a speaker in order to ensure the availability of funding. Procedure: Send request to Head with details and rationale. Then forward Head’s email approval together with the following to the Main Office Clerk: course name and date, and speaker’s name, address, phone number, and social insurance number.

2. RESEARCH

An important part of our work at the University of British Columbia involves the generation and communication of advanced knowledge.  The Department expects publishing with leading presses and in top research journals in sociology, the social sciences more broadly, and in our respective subfields. The Department also expects faculty to earn external funding for their research programs.

As a normal part of their university responsibilities, faculty hold research grants to support their own research and the students whom they supervise.

The university offers support for funding your research.  Support Programs to Advance Research Capacity (SPARC) is a university office designed to assist with project and proposal development (https://sparc.ubc.ca/).

Requests for research grant funding must be approved by the Head. Normal practice is for multiple signatures to be required, at the Department level, the Dean’s level, and sometimes via the Office of Research Services. This process always requires adequate lead time so please factor this into your timeline given grant deadline dates.

The Faculty of Arts has a full-time Grants Facilitator (Pamela Forsberg) who can assist with the granting process at the University.  The Office of Research Services (ORS) can facilitate the managing of your funds here at UBC (ors.ubc.ca).

Research grants are processed through the Finance Department once the Director of Research Services has received confirmation from the granting body or responsible agency. The University must have its research grant records audited and the various organizations supporting University research have become increasingly scrupulous in ensuring that money, much of it public money, is spent wisely and appropriately.

When requesting funds to cover research expenses, please ensure that the paperwork is clear, that original receipts are present and organized, and that the Head has signed expense claims. Keeping our grant records straight is an enormous task for our support staff and it is expected that faculty will make their jobs as easy as possible.  It is the responsibility of faculty members to organize receipts prior to submitting these to the Main Office for processing. You should sort, order and provide an itemized total of all receipts should be sorted, ordered, itemized and totaled with a covering Reimbursement Claims-Summary Sheet form available in the Mail Room (an example is available at the Main Office).

UBC Finance automatically deducts funds from the Department for over-expenditures on grant accounts. Since the Department does not have funds to cover such costs, the grant-holder must pay the over-expenditure. Please keep track of your spending to avoid that situation.

Ethical considerations are the primary responsibility of the researcher. The Research Ethics office in the Office of Research Services reviews all research (faculty, course-related, graduate students). Please check out www.ors.ubc.ca/ethics

 

3. ADMINISTRATION

Main Office (Dan Harper): provides clerical and reception re general office functioning (e.g. supplies, photocopy accounts, Finance & Professional Development reimbursements, meeting room bookings).

Student Advisor (May Chan): provides graduate and undergraduate support (e.g. maintenance of student programs, student appointments - research assistants and teaching assistants, etc).

Head’s Assistant (Kristin Sopotiuk): Assists the Head with general departmental administration, procedures, and events, and handles faculty appointments.

Administrator (Bryan Mathews): Oversees all financial and administrative functions in the department, provides course and classroom scheduling, and manages the physical functioning of the building.

Faculty are expected to do their own copying, faxing, and all other general office tasks. On occasions where there is an unforeseen urgent situation, please see the Administrator who will determine if staff are able to help with your work. Most computer-related enquiries can be efficiently responded to by staff at the Arts Helpdesk (arts.helpdesk@ubc.ca or 604-827-2787)

The ANSO building is opened Mondays through Fridays at 7:00 a.m. and locked at 6:00 p.m. Please be sure not to create opportunities for others to enter if you are in the building outside of these times. This means that doors should not be propped open nor windows left open in an unoccupied space.

The Head and the Administrator allocate offices and keys. See the Main Office staff to request a key for your office. The UBC Parking & Access will send you an email when your key is ready for pick up from their office. Your UBC card will provide access to the building on off hours.  Bring your UBC card to the Main Office to have it activated for building entry.

If you would like someone else to use space assigned to you, you must have prior approval. If you want someone else to have key access to a space for which you have been allocated a key, you must ask the Administrator to request a temporary key assignment.

If you require space for a project, please submit a request describing the time frame, the space required, and any other particulars that would help the Head assign the space effectively.

For occasional space needs (for meetings, etc.), contact the Main Office (soci.dept@ubc.ca).

Teaching related items can be mailed via the out-box in the mailroom.  Please assure the proper tab is clipped to the envelope indicating mailing within Canada or abroad.  This includes departmental correspondence, all matters relating to courses, references for students, etc. Please use your research grants for research related mailings.

Department meetings normally take place the second Tuesday of every month, 11:00-12:30 (save for September and January when it will be the third Tuesday. Special meeting dates may need to be arranged for Department meetings to consider hiring.  All Tenure/Tenure-track Faculty members are expected to attend Department meetings. The Administrator attends to provide information and the Head’s Assistant attends to take notes on any matters which result in a vote or on any ‘action’ items.

The quorum for any Department meeting will constitute 50% plus one of members eligible to vote at a Department meeting (taking into account people away on leave). In the case of voting re hiring, Eligible voting members are defined as follows: all tenured and tenure-track faculty in the Department, 12 month lecturers, and two student members selected to represent graduate students and  undergraduates (the selection procedures to be determined by the GSCS and SSA respectively). Other members of the Department (e.g., staff, sessionals, affiliated faculty, visiting faculty, students) are welcome to attend regular Department meetings. In unusual circumstances the Executive Committee may call for a special Department meeting which only voting members attend. Voting will normally be done by a show of hands (except for hiring, see below, and other matters deemed by the Executive Committee to be of a controversial or sensitive nature). A secret ballot may be used in exceptional circumstances (as requested by any individual). An agenda will be distributed prior to meetings (or, in special cases, at the meeting), although the agenda may be amended at the beginning of any meeting. In cases where individual students, staff, or faculty are discussed, student representatives will not be present.

Good departments are built and maintained by recruiting strong scholars who are effective teachers and researchers. Hiring is also a competitive process where good scholars often have several alternatives. Recruiting needs to balance careful selection and timely process. In the hiring process we need to be transparent with information and intentions, provide sufficient opportunity for all members of the Department to engage with the selection process, and ensure that the process allows sufficient time for making informed decisions.

Decisions about hiring are initially made in consultation with the Dean of Arts.  After obtaining approval for hiring, the Department makes decisions about the job description at a spring Department meeting and we circulate advertisements widely in the summer.  Applications are due in September.  The bulk of hiring takes place in the fall, with job offers ideally made by late November.

A search committee is charged with the task of bringing to a Department meeting a recommended list of potential candidates to be interviewed for tenure track positions (all colleagues are encouraged to read all job application files, as is the graduate student member of the search committee who represents all graduate students). The search committee will distribute a long list of candidates to the Department with sufficient time for review.  The search committee may modify the long list based on feedback received from faculty.  At a Department meeting, the faculty will consider the short list recommendation of the Search Committee, should they propose one.  Voting members of the Department will vote on a short list of three to four candidates to be invited for campus interviews (with several other candidates possibly ranked as additions should someone on the short list decline an interview). Voting on the short list will normally be by show of hands. Voting eligibility is determined by the Collective Agreement and Senior Appointment Committee Guidelines.  In Department meetings considering hiring, any non-eligible members of faculty and the graduate students’ representative on the search committee may provide input although they cannot vote. Members may vote absentee by leaving written instructions with the Head. It is expected that colleagues would be professional and ensure they are well informed prior to instructing the Head on their voting preference(s).  The Office of the Dean of Arts must approve all short lists.

A typical interview for job candidates normally includes a public talk, a panel interview, a meeting with students, meetings with individual faculty, and a meeting with the Head of the Department.

Once candidates have been interviewed, a Department meeting for voting is called.  After a period of discussion of each candidate, decisions about job offers are made by secret ballot of those eligible to vote according to the Collective Agreement.  The Office of the Dean of Arts must approve any recommendation for hiring as made by the Head of the Department.

Confidentiality When issues of a sensitive and personal nature are considered (e.g., hiring decisions, Promotion and Tenure decisions (see below)), the deliberations and votes in the meeting must be held in strict confidence.

The procedures outlined here are in accord with those of the Collective Agreement on Conditions of Appointment for Faculty, which has priority should any dispute arise. This outline complies with Article 5 of the Agreement. Departmental decisions about promotion and tenure are made by a Department Standing Committee (DSC).  The membership of that committee varies based on the rank of the candidate being reviewed.  Details of eligible DSC membership can be found in the Collective Agreement, and the Senior Appointments Committee Guidelines.

Faculty eligible for re-appointment, promotion and/or tenure meet with the Head in the spring of the year prior to discuss the procedures and expectations.  Two faculty members (one appointed by the candidate and one by the Department) form a subcommittee responsible for writing an assessment that discusses scholarship, teaching and service of the candidate.  The DSC meets in the fall and spring to evaluate colleagues eligible for re-appointment, promotion and/or tenure. The University regards attendance at these meetings as obligatory. Eligible members votes on every case based on their reading of the candidate’s dossier. Abstentions count as negative votes. The dossier for re-appointment, promotion, and tenure will normally include an up-to-date UBC CV, teaching evaluations for the most recent five years (and for reappointment, all the most recent years), at least two peer evaluations of teaching, and a sample of scholarly contributions selected by the candidate. Voting is normally done by a show of hands, but when requested by members of the committee, will be done by secret ballot. Serious concerns that arise in a P.A.T. Committee meeting will be communicated to the candidate in writing and the candidate will have an opportunity to respond in writing. In cases of Joint Appointments, the procedures outlined here may be modified to conform with those laid out at the time of appointment.

The Department includes the following standing committees: Awards, Communications, Graduate Studies, Seminars, Undergraduate Studies, and Visiting Faculty.  The GSCS and the SSA also act as standing committees to the Department.  Committee chairs typically serve a three-year term.  Each spring Departmental committee memberships are appointed. Committee duties run from July 1 to June 30. Duties rotate so that someone may have very heavy committee responsibilities one year, and light ones another year. We try to distribute work fairly.

Committees have a great deal of autonomy although in the UBC system they are advisory to the Head. Committees bring Motions to Department Meetings if they wish to alter procedures, and otherwise submit regular reports to Department Meetings. All committees should ensure that they have an up-to-date mandate reflecting their objectives and responsibilities. This is especially important so new committee members understand expectations and so that outside reviewers have a clear sense of lines of responsibility within the Department.

Please inform the Main Office Secretary (soci.dept@ubc.ca) of any absences from campus that are greater than two days. Instructors are responsible for teaching and other responsibilities in their absence.

Faculty are responsible for keeping their web pages up to date. For help with WordPress (the current web editing program), faculty should contact the Arts Learning Centre at 2-0204 or arts.helpdesk@ubc.ca.  CVs must be up-dated annually and available on faculty webpages or emailed to the Department Head’s Assistant by the end of the Winter Session each year, for salary purposes. UBC CV Form is on the Faculty Relations website, under ‘forms’. It is not mandatory to use this form but it is important to follow this standard UBC CV format.

Faculty must submit a report of activities each year. These should outline work done between April 1 – March 31 under these categories:

  1. Teaching - courses, credits, # students, Reading courses, Graduate student supervision, Honors student supervision, Graduate committees
  2. Scholarship For research stream faculty, articles, books published (incl. page #s) in press or forthcoming (confirmed), Grants received / continuing / applied for, Book reviews, Conference papers, Guest lectures elsewhere, Non-academic articles, Unpublished reports, Work in progress (detailed). For educational leadership stream faculty, innovation and enhancements to teaching and learning beyond the classroom (including securing funding), curriculum development and renewal, engagement with the scholarship of teaching and learning, capacity building for excellence in education.
  3. Service - Department and University, professional, community

Annual reports are the basis for merit / career progress assessments. Colleagues may include with their report a short statement of the nature and significance of their activities. Further information on the report is available from the Head. Merit recommendations are made to the Head by the Executive Committee of the Department.

Money is tight so please be certain to make appropriate use of opportunities such as the following. Please help to reduce administrative costs by submitting receipts for reimbursement in bulk, when possible.

  • Professional Development Fund. Each year regular faculty members and continuing sessionals are eligible for money from the Professional Development Reimbursement Fund. Information and the form are available on the Faculty Relations website. Click on the ‘Compensation’ link at hr.ubc.ca/faculty_relations. Funds can be used to cover expenses such as travel, conference fees, professional memberships, etc.
  • Books: Thanks to an endowment, the Department has the Burwell Book Fund which provides $300 to each tenure stream faculty member each year for the purchase of books related to their research and/or teaching activities. Receipts should be provided to Department staff for reimbursement. Please note that this fund should typically be used only AFTER your PDF Funds have been used up.
  • Humanities and Social Science Travel Grant: A small amount of funding to cover the dissemination of research results is available from the HSS fund.(Seeors.ubc.ca/ for details.)
  • SSHRC International Travel Fund: A small amount of funding to cover the dissemination of research results at international venues is also available.

 

4. HEALTH AND SAFETY

The Department of Sociology works together with the Department of Anthropology and other departments housed in the ANSO building to maintain an active ANSO Building Safety Committee. This LHSC (Local Health and Safety Committee) meets monthly to:

  • Assist in creating a safe and healthy workplace
  • Assist with employee concerns relating to health and safety
  • Promote compliance with applicable rules and regulations
  • Participate in worksite inspections
  • Participate in incident/accident investigations
  • Accompany WorkSafeBC officers on inspections
  • Make recommendations to the department head

This document is maintained to ensure the safety of the building occupants through any emergency situation and to provide a checklist of procedures for responding to, and reporting, an emergency. It is posted on bulletin boards in the Administrative hallway, and available on the Connect Workshop space “STAR”.

For your TAs, RAs (your employees)

Supervisors of new employees are required to provide safety orientation to their employees. This policy ensures UBC complies with WorkSafeBC. In brief here are the steps. Provide the link below to your employee. They will be asked to complete the online quiz and bring it to you as their supervisor, so they can complete the site specific safety orientation. Upon completion, print a copy for the employee’s records, as well as a copy for you as supervisor as documented proof of their orientation. Please forward this document to the Administrator so that it can be kept on file. https://www.hse2.ubc.ca/moodle/login/index.php

Mandatory Training for all Workers

New employees are required to complete the following mandatory courses, to meet WorkSafeBC and UBC requirements. At UBC, a worker includes, Senior Executives, Faculty, Staff, and Student workers. (rms.ubc.ca)

New Worker Safety Orientation
Workplace Bullying & Harassment Training
Workplace Hazardous Material Information Systems (WHMIS) Training
Workplace Violence Prevention
Accident Incident Reporting & Investigation

As well, there are staff who have training in ergonomics who can assist with setting up proper workstations. Please see the Administrator if you require assistance from an Ergonomics representative.

Sustainability is important to UBC and to our Department. Sociology encourages carbon offsetting for travel, has plenty of bike racks, and a shower room (for cyclist commuters).  There are recycling stations throughout the building and battery and toner recycling in the mail room. The Department currently has one Sustainability Coordinator (Kristin Sopotiuk) who is responsible for actively liaising with the Sustainability Office and the Department to keep up to speed and informed of current sustainability issues. ANSO Patio Gardens have been established through a Healthy Workplace Initiative grant and a Xerox grant from the Sustainability Office. As well, Guerilla gardens flourish around the building. Please help in sustaining these initiatives. Department members are encouraged to always consider the environment when making decisions in their office. (i.e., student papers should be requested double-sided, without a separate title page, etc.).

Prof. Amin Ghaziani quoted extensively in the New York Times

in a feature story on the fate of gay neighborhoods: “There Goes the Gayborhood.”

Prof. Amin Ghaziani featured in Billy Penn article

about the “straightwashing” of gay bars and LGBTQ spaces: “Straightwashing: Woody’s and how Philly’s gay bars are less gay.”

Prof. Neil Guppy featured in the Globe and Mail

talking about the murky intersection of academic freedom, safe spaces and private donors on university campuses: “Your rights, my rights: Academic freedom faces off with a clarion call for safety on campus.”

UBC Sociology Department Newsletter Spring 2017 Released

Prof. Nathan Lauster on CBC’s BC Almanac talking housing affordability

Prof. Richard Carpiano talks to Roundhouse Radio about Vaccinations and Social Norms

Prof. Amin Ghaziani has been elected to serve on the Council of the Collective Behavior/Social Movements Section of the American Sociological Association.

The 3 year term places Prof. Ghaziani in a leadership position in one of the largest sections of the ASA.

 

Research by Prof. Gerry Veenstra is featured in a Digital Journal article.

The research aims to look for patterns of musical preference with social class: “Does musical taste reveal social class?”